Fashion Journal: 1900-1909

Hello, lovely people! The spring semester here at college is winding down, and as a part of my final project for a fashion history class, I am going to be putting out a fashion journal for every decade, from 1900 to 1999. Because of that, I’m going to be publishing FIVE articles a week, instead of three, because I already have my normal articles planned out and set to be published on their normal days. Basically, this is how the fashion journal is going to go: I’m going to post pictures of three garments from each decade, and compare it to a modern garment that was inspired by it. I’ll also be including the sources to the images at the bottom of each article, if you’re interested in looking further into it. Without further adieu, let’s jump into the 1910s!

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On the left: 1907

The first garment that struck my eye is the arrow shirt collar, which was popular in women’s blouses in the 1910s. This collar was desirable to women, because they wanted to appear slim, and with a low, full chest. At the time, being slimmed and elongated meant you were a confident woman, so the silhouette was well-sought out. The garment on the left is pictured from 1907, and perfectly represents that “pigeon-breast” shape. In turn, we can see the inspiration from the arrow shirt collar in this modern blouse, which is manufactured by Farfetch. The flare style, long sleeves, and even the embroidery are reminiscent of the ideal womanly shape in the 1910s, and to this day, it’s still a very flattering, popular design.


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On the left: Early Paul Poiret turban

Hair turbans were also very fashionable at the time, especially with the emergence of Paul Poiret’s designs. As a very theatrical, bold designer, Poiret loved to dress a sophisticated woman, who literally dressed from head to toe. The glittery, dazzling, romantic aura of Poiret’s turban (seen on the left) undeniably inspired the popularity of fashion turbans today. The turban on the right is designed by Julia Clancey, and everything from the backdrop to the turban itself screams “Poiret” to me. The modern turban strikes me as being very theatrical and glamorous, and that’s exactly the aura Paul Poiret wanted to put out.


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Top: Early Homburg Hat, 1907

Now, let’s not leave out men’s fashion! Interestingly, the popular men’s hat on the left, the Homburg Hat, has now become universally unisex. The Homburg Hat was originally made of stiff wool felt, and was characterized by a single dent running down the center of the crown. On the bottom, we can still see the iconic dent, but this hat is made of faux fur and has an embellished bright feather on the side. Like I said, this hat has become a gender-less accessory, while still upkeeping a classic, old-fashioned beauty. It’s interesting to me how shapes and designs can transform socially, while still staying the same structurally, and the Homburg hat is a perfect example of that.


Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1900s_in_Western_fashion#Style_gallery_1900%E2%80%931906https://www.elyxboutique.com/products/elyx-turbans-by-julia-clanceyhttps://www.villagehatshop.com/product/all-fedoras/451139-75907/stetson-fur-felt-homburg-hat.html?gclid=Cj0KCQjw7YblBRDFARIsAKkK-dKklx0sLfknZegAHcSNPIZsfHRzAGct-FCQNvmO76UUgpyGI91Tkw4aAlM9EALw_wcB

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